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FortWhyte Alive

FortWhyte Alive Volunteers Helping to Protect Our Feathered Friends

A small group of volunteers at FortWhyte Alive has been quietly working away on a new strategy to protect birds traveling through on migration.

Across North America, the estimated number of migrating birds killed annually in collisions with buildings ranges from 100 million to 1 billion birds. That’s an estimated 1 to 10 birds per building per year, according to FLAP Canada, an organization focused on migratory birds in the urban environment.

As FortWhyte Alive is a birding hotspot located on the Central Flyway, we must protect migrating birds that stop off to rest on their journey through our property.

A small group of volunteers at FortWhyte Alive has been quietly working away on a new strategy to protect birds traveling through on migration. In fact, 10 dedicated volunteers gave over 150 hours completing this project. Wow!

This spring, both the Alloway Reception Centre and Interpretive Centre windows have been retrofitted with homemade bird saving wind curtains.

How does it work?

A window reflects the outdoor environment. When birds see windows, they just see trees and clear skies.

With the wind curtains installed, birds see the cords and adjust their flight path to avoid a collision. This installation is expected to reduce collisions by 90% or greater.

Window strike curtains installed on windows of the Interpretive Centre

What about anti-strike stickers or decals?

Anti-strike stickers leave gaps that birds still perceive as open sky. For stickers to be effective, they need to be no more than 4” apart, affecting visibility through the window for humans inside.

Want to try making your own bird savers for your home?

Plans and explanation of the wind curtains can be found on this website.


Volunteers are the ones on the ground, cultivating relationships with nature and making a difference in real time. Thank you, FortWhyte Alive volunteers!


 

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